Book Review of George Marshall: A Biography

Not sure if I shall bother reading this new biography of George Marshall, but here is a review of it in the New Republic.  Concluding paragraph says a lot about George Marshall the man: For a military man, Marshall’s heroism was peculiar. It did not arise from his conduct on the battlefield. It arose from his modesty, including “a modest daily schedule that often ended at three or four o’clock in the afternoon” and his avoidance “of lucrative corporate board memberships so commonly available to retired high military officers in our more avaricious times.” Most importantly, Marshall’s modesty flowed from […]

The Burden of War

Falleth not upon the Soldier, or Marine, or Sailor, or Airman.  But on the people who sent him to that beach without water.  Here‘s an interesting article by Sebastian Junger who has spent much of his journalistic career embedded among Soldiers to tell their story. The Soldier. . .is a tool.  When you hammer a nail as you build a bed frame, what take responsibility for it?  The hammer?  I would say no.  It must be the person hammering the nail.  To that effect, the Soldier is a tool, he should not bear the majority of the pain or blame […]

Respect for Our Fallen

Not a country fan, but I love this song by Trace Adkins. 

Cruzada de los ninos, or, so you thought you had a military retirement

Updated Nothing in life is free. Someone is paying for creating the America’s greatest humanitarian disaster of this century: a modern Cruzada de los niños. The logistics for transporting children from Central America apart from their parents is enormous. Consider how much goes into moving 100,000 soldiers from America to Kuwait. The folks paying for all of this expect to be repaid with American tax dollars. These children, now our wards, need food, water, clothing, shelter, and will get an education. And likely medical and mental health care – because these are the ones who survived the trip. Instantly, close to a […]

Now that the VA problems have been solved

…by the firing of Eric Shinseki, our veterans are getting the very best of government-run, socialist medical care. Right? Right? Readers: what were your best and worst VA experiences? Or a funny one?

Shinseki fired: feel-good non-measure wins against taking Action

Shinseki is out as Secretary of Veterans Affairs. Now that the politicos can claim something has been done, America will return to its Brigadoon-like state. Another feel-good non-measure wins against taking true action.

Shinseki is not the problem

Whatever else he is, GEN (R) Eric Shinseki is not the problem at the Department of Veteran Affairs. Firing him solves nothing, and serves only as a distraction: everyone offended by the criminality and incompetence of the VA will feel good about his ouster. “Feeling Good” is what the Leftists preach – our veterans and their families and care-givers need results instead. Taking ‘feel good’ actions only serves to distract from the structural problems of the intrinsic lack of respect for the Secretary, philosophical homogeneity, and resistance to change that makes the VA a collection of rogue satrapies that murder veterans.   […]

I Rarely Get Pissed!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I rarely get pissed, but I did today when I saw a very well written, poorly argued, and flawed factually editorial in the New York Times.  I am not normally a reader of the New York Times as I have found it New York and Eastern establishment elitism hard to stomach. Today’s piece is over the top.  In this piece, the author, Dr. Kathleen Belew, attempts—albeit poorly to suggest that “but Vietnam veterans forged the first links between Klansman and Nazis since World War II.”  She goes on to suggest that it was the Vietnam Veteran who led these individuals […]

“Strategic Advice for Congress”

By way of BR F.– not to be confused with “BRF”– comes this: Good strategists always ask of any potential course of action two key questions.  First, what will this do for us?  And second, what will this do to us?  Given the dearth of statesmanly impulse at the national level in modern America, it is perhaps unsurprising that in crafting the recent budget, Paul Ryan and Patty Murray asked only the former question, leaving the latter for others to worry about. The provision at issue retroactively renegotiated the deferred compensation of more than two million military veterans – including […]

A Sad Legacy of World War II

No commentary, I commend this article to each of our readers. The U.S. government lobotomized roughly 2,000 mentally ill veterans—and likely hundreds more—during and after World War II, according to a cache of forgotten memos, letters and government reports unearthed by The Wall Street Journal. Besieged by psychologically damaged troops returning from the battlefields of North Africa, Europe and the Pacific, the Veterans Administration performed the brain-altering operation on former servicemen it diagnosed as depressives, psychotics and schizophrenics, and occasionally on people identified as homosexuals.