A Report on the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program

From the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence [sic], for your review and comment. (Here’s some not-so-fast criticism from someone in the know. And this, too. And THIS!) War is an ugly business, and it’s not for the faint of heart. What, now?  

Thanksgiving 2014

Happy Thanksgiving to all, especially those who have to put the tray down and grab the binos… (Lifted from FB.)

Veterans as Journalists, or how to find an answer

An article over at DefenseOne paints journalist-vets as the heroes of the effort to expose a military cover-up over the use of WMD in Iraq. Perhaps it takes veterans to cover the news since our newsies are curiously incurious. What they uncovered was astonishing: U.S. and Iraqi forces had secretly recovered about 5,000 chemical weapons during the eight-year war, with the first report documenting 17 American and seven Iraqi soldiers injured by mustard and nerve agents—including the only documented battlefield exposures to a nerve agent in U.S. military history. The Pentagon, later prompted by the story,revealed the number wounded as higher than […]

I miss SAC

Warfare is deadly serious business. The Air Force is neither deadly nor serious about business. The world can’t wait for our Air Force to grow up or for Buttercup to learn to spell “You’re Fired.” Reduce the Air Force to the Civil Air Patrol and let’s get with securing the United States of America.

Max Boot on Small Wars

Watch, read, think. Well, if we could avoid getting involved in wars, I think everybody would be happier. The problem is, as we’ve seen over the course of our long history, there’s really been very few, if any, presidents who have actually succeeded in staying away from such conflicts and especially now, when the U.S. is the preeminent power in the world and insurgency is the preeminent form of warfare. Almost nobody is fighting the kind of conventional tank-on-tank engagements that the U.S. military pines for and does so well at. Almost everybody is fighting using guerilla and terrorist tactics, […]

As Goes Camp Leatherneck…

Submitted without comment. This too. Both are worth reading. What say you?

Beirut, Thirty-One Years Ago

Thirty-one years ago, TODAY. As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s. The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later […]

STAND WITH CANADA

WE STAND WITH CANADA. The fight goes on. It knows no boundaries or borders. We’d best understand it and get ready for it here. Of particular note to this blog and much of its readership– the soldier who was on guard at the War Memorial and subsequently killed, was a reservist, a citizen-soldier. One of us. Here’s his regiment. I served in Kabul with several Canadians. Good men, all. They stood with us. We stand with them.

“White Shroud” Hunting ISIS?

More than interesting. Inferences to be drawn: they make do with second-rate or third-rate gear and still score kills; they have steeled their hearts for the task at hand; ISIS (or whatever they call themselves) *can* be surprised and given an unexpected bloody nose. And they do it without airstrikes. Not a war-winning organization, and might just end up being another skid mark on the road of war, but this shows that some people just won’t lie down and die. Just imagine what they could do if a task-organized liaison element joined them to align efforts, provide some log support, […]

“The Islamic State’s Anbar Offensive and Abu Umar al-Shishani”

“Al-Shishani.” Shishani—born Tarkhan Batirashvili—is a young field commander, just twenty-eight years old. As his names suggests, he is of Chechen origin and was born in Georgia’s Pankisi Valley. He served in an intelligence unit in the Georgian army, and the Wall Street Journal reports in a profile of the young militant that in the 2008 conflict with Russia he “was near the front line, spying on Russian tank columns and relaying their coordinates to Georgian artillery units.” However, in 2010 Shishani was diagnosed with tuberculosis and ultimately discharged from military service. The Journal’s profile of Shishani noted that after being […]