Punk Journalism and the F-35

SMSgt Mac delivers a fisking of David Axe’s recent article on the F-35. It’s long and worth the read. Thank you SMSgt Mac!  I first encountered the term ‘Punk Journalism’ in the headline of a UK newspaper article online while surfing the web years ago. The article is currently preserved elsewhere, but it struck me at the time that it provided the keywords and framework for extracting a very workable definition of same: Punk Journalism:  \ˈpəŋk  jər-nə-ˌli-zəm’\  : Reporting or commentary that is sullied by scorn, prejudice and petulance, is wrong or distorted on the facts, and delivered in a […]

Stray Shots from Across the Net

I haven’t done this in awhile, but scattering of articles gathered from across the Internet on all things military. Item 1:  This just proves that most in the Army are ham fisted when it comes to anything to do with dealing with Congress or the media.  An email sent to two people dealing with the opening of roles for women, is then forwarded to every Public Affairs Officer in TRADOC.  Did not the recipient before he hit send think about what he was doing?  Does it pass the Washington Post test (in this case the Politico test), will it stay […]

Syria-go-round

Bill Roggio and Lisa Lundquist ask some good questions. I’ll add one to their list: what if the US hits Syria’s WMD stocks? The British reporters seem to have caught on. The Wall Street Journal: Champion of OPSEC? With the WH broadcasting the basic plan, the USAF vs. Russian ADA fight is going to be intense. Meanwhile, cyber warfare continues. Hacking financial systems have more impact than Tomahawks and bombers.  

Gun-day Monday

When you can’t afford your own RPG, but still need to bring down troublesome Tyranosaurs, or wind down a sharknado, this is the gun for you!

“Hands-Free” Carrier Landing?!

Maybe I’ve been missing something, but I think THIS falls into the “Holy Shit!” category. The fact that they landed it by remote is interesting enough, but the really hair-raising part is this: A pilot and a flight officer were in the cockpit in case human intervention was needed, but the landing was “hands-free” – controlled by a linked computer network on the ship and the plane. The idea of unmanned naval aviation is intriguing– and not least because there are no bonuses or flight pay involved.

SmartPhones for the Masses!

Good article over at DoD Buzz on the whether the Army’s desire to provide SmartPhones to every soldier will survive the coming budget reductions or whether Congress will go along with its plan.  There is a link in the DoD Buzz article to the Army Web Site and the CSAs comments on SmartPhones.

Robots -what can't they do?

” …and my mom said all those years of playing video games would never pay off!” Great quote from a soldier trying out the latest in Army tech, robots that can fire weapons, remove ordinance, and perform ISR tasks, keeping troops out of harm’s way. Soldiers from the 519th Military Police Battalion, 1st Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, watched futuristic technology turn to reality during a demonstration at Range 9, here, Aug. 5. The presentation, by Foster-Miller Defense Technology Solutions, showcased the latest in Soldier-saving technology for the battlefield and urban environments. “These robots can replace Soldiers in dangerous situations,” said Adrian […]

Russia vs US arms sales Abroad

No, that title is not breaking news from 1984. Over at Popular Mechanics, they outline 6 “hot spots” where US/Russia weapons are still pointed at each other. PM explains: …equipment designed by the two nations remains on opposite sides of 21st-century battlefields. This isn’t surprising: America is the top vendor of major conventional weapons, and Russia ranks number two. Both countries share a legacy of making military equipment to counter the other’s capabilities and a long history of parlaying arms sales into geopolitical influence. These deals, sanctioned by both national governments, are extensions of foreign policy. A resurgent Russia wants […]

The Pentagon’s Internet “Civil War”?

Wired.com has an interesting piece by David Axe on the Air Force’s decision to ban access to many blogs, and how the Army has worked around it to use the Internet to encourage the free flow of ideas. He expounds a bit more in The Washington Independent. I don’t know if I’d go so far as to call it an Internet “civil war”, but I think it is demonstrative of the intellectual flexibility that the Army has acquired in recent years. The Army cleverly dodged the bans, setting up its own versions of popular Web 2.0 sites, but hiding them […]

A Hybrid M113?

Yeah, apparently: I guess the $4 a gallon gas price is hitting the Pentagon too…